America’s Conversation is Here

Throughout history, Montgomery has sparked some of our country’s most vital conversations while also facing our nation’s greatest challenges. 

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Throughout history, Montgomery has sparked some of our country’s most vital conversations while also facing our nation’s greatest challenges.  In a span of 100 years, Montgomery went from the cradle of the confederacy to the birthplace of the Civil Rights movement. The conversation that began in 1955 with the Montgomery Bus Boycott is still ongoing today with a new museum and memorial which will carry forward the city’s impactful legacy.

To walk around town is to experience history and the first stop on any tour is historic Dexter Avenue in Montgomery’s downtown.  Located in the shadow of the state capital this most historic of America’s short streets is ground zero for the Civil Rights Movement. It was here, beside Court Square Fountain, that courageous local Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a city bus. This pivotal moment of defiance kicked off the Civil Rights Movement that led to sweeping changes across the United States.

Further down the street, visitors will find the Dexter Avenue King Memorial Baptist Church, the place where Martin Luther King, Jr. transformed from a charismatic preacher to a respected leader of the movement. A few blocks away, his former home, the Dexter Parsonage remains, lovingly preserved with artifacts from his inspirational life.

A visit to Montgomery is not complete without a trip to Civil Rights Museum and Memorial where you will learn about those who paid the ultimate price for equality and take a pledge to support equal rights on the Wall of Tolerance.

Then, to come full circle, a short trip to the outskirts of downtown will bring you to the Equal Justice Initiative’s Memorial to Peace and Justice and Legacy Museum in Montgomery. Opening in April this will be America’s first national memorial dedicated to victims of racial terror lynching and a new museum dedicated to slavery and its legacy. Modeled on important projects used to overcome difficult histories of human rights abuses in other countries, the sites are designed to promote a more hopeful commitment to racial equality and just treatment of all people. Learn more about the project at museumandmemorial.eji.org.

There’s no better place to join America’s conversation than in Montgomery, and there’s no better time than now.

Explore More MGM:

The New York Times names Montgomery among “52 Places to Go in 2018” 

Atlanta Journal Constitution“Visit to Montgomery is great chance to explore civil rights history” 

TravelPulse.com: Montgomery Announces New Developments for 2018 and Beyond”

The Skift:First U.S. National Civil Rights Trail Seeks International Tourism Appeal”

Book Your Visit:

Check out all that Montgomery has to offer, find hotels, restaurants and attractions at www.visitingmontgomery.com

 

 

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